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Harvey Weinstein and the seeming intractability of the ‘open secret’




Harvey Weinstein attends the 'The Immigrant' premiere during The 66th Annual Cannes Film Festival at the Palais des Festivals on May 24, 2013 in Cannes, France.
Harvey Weinstein attends the 'The Immigrant' premiere during The 66th Annual Cannes Film Festival at the Palais des Festivals on May 24, 2013 in Cannes, France.
Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images

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“Open secret” is one term that has been used over and over again to describe disgraced movie producer Harvey Weinstein’s behaviors.

As more women speak up about how they were harassed – and in some cases, assaulted – by Weinstein, the fact that what he did was widely known and unexposed has become as unfathomable as the revelations themselves.

How could behaviors as damaging as those perpetrated by Weinstein and by media power players like Roger Ailes and Bill O’Reilly become buried for so long, and why? As revelations of sexual harassment in different industries – from Fox News, to Hollywood, to Silicon Valley – come to the fore, do you feel more empowered to speak out about exploitative behaviors in your workplace?  

In a Time magazine essay, actor Mira Sorvino has detailed why she decided to speak out in a New Yorker article about her experiences with Weinstein and has issued a call to action for other women to follow suit, whatever industry they are in. How have the Weinstein revelations impacted you?

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With guest host Libby Denkmann.  

Guest:

Kim Elsesser, author of the book, “Sex and the Office” (Taylor Trade Publishing, 2015); lecturer at UCLA, where she teaches courses on gender in the workplace