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What’s left of the JFK assassination documents might drop Thursday – why are some government agencies pushing back?




US President John Fitzgerald Kennedy signs the order of naval blockade of Cuba, on October 24, 1962.
US President John Fitzgerald Kennedy signs the order of naval blockade of Cuba, on October 24, 1962.
AFP/AFP/Getty Images

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On Saturday, Trump tweeted plans to disclose what’s left of the National Archives and Record Administration’s documents on President John F. Kennedy’s assassination.

In 1992, The Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act was passed as a reaction to Oliver Stone’s film “JFK,” with the goal of putting conspiracy theories to rest. It required that the JFK documents, many of which are from the CIA, be released in 25 years, a deadline which falls on this coming Thursday.

It’s still unclear whether Trump will release the documents in full or whether they will be redacted. According to the Washington Post, government agencies have asked the president not to release some of the documents.

What is the timeline of the document release? Who are the factions involved and why are some government agencies opposed to the full release of these documents?

Guest:

Phil Shenon, former Washington and foreign correspondent for the New York Times; author of “A Cruel and Shocking Act: The Secret History of the Kennedy Assassination