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Why the National Parks Service wants to hike up entrance fees during peak season




A helicopter view of a waterfall in Yosemite National Park June 19, 2016 in Yosemite Vally, California.
A helicopter view of a waterfall in Yosemite National Park June 19, 2016 in Yosemite Vally, California.
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

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The National Parks Service says some of its parks are beginning to show their age, so to fix them up, they’re proposing a fee hike that would double the price of entrance for one vehicle during a five month period in peak season to generate more revenue that NPS can put back into park maintenance.

The public has until November 23rd to weigh in on the proposal, but some members of the public say that the fee increase goes too far, and will prevent some families from being able to afford a trip to the parks. NPS says the fee hike will generate $68 million to help offset the current repair bill of about $11.3 billion.

What do you think of the fee increase? If you’re against it, what other methods do you think NPS could employ to raise money for repairs?

Guest:

Emily Guerin, reporter at KPCC covering the environment who’s been following the story; she tweets @guerinemily