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The mustang: a contradicting symbol of the American West




Wild horses roam free on state and some private land, outside federal disengaged horse management areas on May 31, 2017 outside Milford, Utah.
Wild horses roam free on state and some private land, outside federal disengaged horse management areas on May 31, 2017 outside Milford, Utah.
George Frey/Getty Images

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New York Times and Pulitzer-winning journalist David Philipps explores the changing symbolism of wild horses in the U.S.

As Philipps details in his new book, “Wild Horse Country,” the mustang is worshipped for being an expression of unfettered freedom, but also tightly managed by federal and state agencies for the destruction it can wrought on the ecosystems.

But the answer for these wild horses may lie in a wild horse region in California. The area, with its thriving population of mountain lions, has demonstrated that predators might provide a key in naturally managing the wild horse populations.

Guest:

David Philipps, Pulitzer Prize-winning national reporter for the New York Times; author of the book, “Wild Horse Country: The History, Myth, and Future of the Mustang” (W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., 2017)