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Should California’s last operating nuclear power plant remain open?




Aerial view of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant which sits on the edge of the Pacific Ocean at Avila Beach in San Luis Obispo County, California on March 17, 2011.
Aerial view of the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant which sits on the edge of the Pacific Ocean at Avila Beach in San Luis Obispo County, California on March 17, 2011.
MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images

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The fate of California’s last remaining nuclear power plant will soon be decided.

The California Public Utilities Commission will hear closing arguments today on whether to close the Diablo Canyon Power Plant in San Luis Obispo.

The plant, opened since 1985, provides power for some 3 million people. Seismic safety is one concern critics of Diablo cite in wanting to see the plant closed. But proponents say nuclear remains one of the more efficient alternative energy sources out there.

A decision is expected by the end of the year.

Guests: 

Ralph Cavanagh, energy program co-director of the Natural Resources Defense Council; he is arguing for the retirement and replacement of the Diablo Canyon Power Plant at the California Public Utilities Commission hearing today

Gene Nelson, government liaison for Californians for Green Nuclear Power, an advocacy group that aims to promote carbon-free energy and supports the Diablo Canyon Power Plant; he has a Ph.D. in radiation biophysics