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How a new bill could affect whether people carry concealed weapons across state lines




A model walks the runway during the NRA Concealed Carry Fashion Show on Friday, August 25, 2017 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
A model walks the runway during the NRA Concealed Carry Fashion Show on Friday, August 25, 2017 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
AFP Contributor/AFP/Getty Images

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In light of recent shootings in Las Vegas and Texas, a House committee approved a bill Wednesday to allow people with a permit to carry concealed weapons across state lines.

As the San Francisco Chronicle reports, the Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act, HR38, would allow people from states with and without concealed carry permit laws to bring concealed weapons into states with strict gun laws. Republicans argue that wait time for police during shootings may be cut short if civilians carrying guns could intervene. The GOP bill could get a House vote as soon as next week, according to Rep. Mike Thompson (D-CA).

As expected, Democrats including Dianne Feinstein are have challenged the bill, but some Dems facing re-election next year in conservative states could be pressured to vote in favor of HR38. 

If the bill passes, how will it affect states with strict gun control laws like California?

Guests:

Michael Hammond, legislative counsel at Gun Owners of America, a gun rights organization based in Springfield, VA

Lindsay Nichols, federal policy director at Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, a gun control organization headquartered in San Francisco