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AirTalk asks: How do third-, fourth- generations identify with their cultural heritage?




William Bello of Upland is draped in an American flag during a pro-immigration vigil in Murrieta. His family is originally from Mexico City and said that he supports the families coming to the states that are
William Bello of Upland is draped in an American flag during a pro-immigration vigil in Murrieta. His family is originally from Mexico City and said that he supports the families coming to the states that are "escaping bad things in South America."
Benjamin Brayfield/KPCC

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According to a new Pew Research Center study, of the estimated 24.7 million adults living in the United States with Hispanic ancestry, roughly 5 million (11 percent) do not identify as being Hispanic or Latino.

The contrast rises sharpest among third and fourth generations, where 23 percent and 50 percent consider themselves non-Hispanic, consecutively, despite being part of one of the fastest-growing ethnic groups in the country.

If you have immigrant roots, how have you identified with your cultural heritage? Have you experienced a fade in racial identity from being of later generations in your family? Or maybe you’ve experienced a shift in previously distancing yourself from your ancestry to embracing it over the years? We want to hear from AirTalk listeners about how you navigate with self-identified culture. Call us at 866-893-5722.

Guest:

Mark Hugo Lopez, director of Hispanic Research at Pew Research Center; one of the authors behind the Pew study, “Hispanic Identity Fades Across Generations as Immigrant Connections Fall Away” that was released yesterday