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JAMA study finds an uptick in pregnant women using pot for nausea




An Israeli woman prepares marijuana plants for smoking at the BOL (Breath Of Life) Pharma  in northern Israel, on March 9, 2016.
An Israeli woman prepares marijuana plants for smoking at the BOL (Breath Of Life) Pharma in northern Israel, on March 9, 2016.
JACK GUEZ/AFP/Getty Images

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A new study from The Journal of the American Medical Association finds a slight increase in the number of pregnant women it surveyed who used marijuana to relieve nausea or pregnancy-related anxiety.

The survey used data between 2009 and 2016 from about 300,000 pregnant women in California through a large health care system in the state. Marijuana usage was determined from urine toxicology tests and self reporting.

The results show that pot use rose from 4.2% to 7.1% during the period of study. In addition, the rate of marijuana usage was more pronounced among younger pregnant women. For those younger than 18, it went up from 12.5% to 21.8%. For those between the ages of 18 and 24, pot usage went up close to 10%, from 9.8% to 19%.

Guest host Alex Cohen discusses the findings with study author Kelly Young-Wolff, and Dr. Allison Bond and Dr. Leena Nathan.

Guests:

Kelly Young-Wolff, PhD, MPH, clinical psychologist and research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research; she is the lead author of the JAMA letter “Trends in Self-reported and Biochemically Tested Marijuana Use Among Pregnant Females in California From 2009-2016

Allison Bond M.D., medical writer and hospitalist in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston

Leena Nathan, M.D., OB-GYN and assistant clinical professor at UCLA Health