Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Does Apple have a responsibility to curb mobile addiction in kids?




A boy plays with an iPhone in Brazil's first Apple retail store minutes after it opened to the public for the first time in the Village Mall shopping center on February 15, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
A boy plays with an iPhone in Brazil's first Apple retail store minutes after it opened to the public for the first time in the Village Mall shopping center on February 15, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Listen to story

10:49
Download this story 7.0MB

Two major Apple investors have urged the iPhone maker to take action to curb growing smartphone addiction among children, highlighting growing concern about the effects of gadgets and social media on youngsters.

New York-based Jana Partners LLC and the California State Teachers' Retirement System, or CalSTRS, said Monday in open letter to Apple that the company must offer more choices and tools to help children fight addiction to its devices.

In response to the letter, Apple has released a statement to the Wall Street Journal:

“We think deeply about how our products are used and the impact they have on users and the people around them,” the statement reads. “We take this responsibility very seriously and we are committed to meeting and exceeding our customers’ expectations, especially when it comes to protecting kids.”

Yesterday, former Apple executive and co-designer of the iPhone Tony Fadell wrote a series of tweets discussing the problem and proposing solutions, for both Apple and users. Here are three of his ten tweets:

https://twitter.com/tfadell/status/950329842196721664?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

https://twitter.com/tfadell/status/950330418615717888?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

https://twitter.com/tfadell/status/950330740876759040?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Do you think the onus to curb iPhone addiction is on Apple or users? If you’re a parent, how do you limit your kids (or your own) phone use?

With files from Associated Press.

Guest:

Shira Ovide, technology columnist for Bloomberg Gadfly, Bloomberg’s opinion section; she tweets @ShiraOvide