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States can now require some Medicaid recipients to work, but what’s the practical impact?




U.S. President Donald Trump makes remarks in the Oval Office prior to signing the bipartisan Interdict Act, a bill to stop the flow of opioids into the United States, on January 10, 2018 in Washington, D.C.
U.S. President Donald Trump makes remarks in the Oval Office prior to signing the bipartisan Interdict Act, a bill to stop the flow of opioids into the United States, on January 10, 2018 in Washington, D.C.
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In a major policy shift, the Trump administration said Thursday it is offering a path for states that want to impose work requirements on Medicaid recipients.

Ten states -- Arizona, Arkansas, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, New Hampshire, North Carolina, Utah and Wisconsin -- have applied for a federal waiver to add the work requirement.

It is highly unlikely that California would seek such a request.

Seema Verma, head of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, said work and community involvement can make a positive difference in people's lives and in their health. Still, the plan probably will face strong political opposition and even legal challenges over concerns that some low-income beneficiaries will lose coverage.  

With files from the Associated Press

Guest:

Phil Galewitz, senior correspondent covering  medicaid and medicare and healthcare issues for Kaiser Health News; he’s been following the story; he tweets @philgalewitz