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We have the tech to surveil kids like never before – what are the repercussions and boundaries?




Logan Roe, 7, tries out the augmented reality system that shows what the finished Apple Park will look like at the opening of the Apple Park Visitor Center on November 17, 2017 in Cupertino, California.
Logan Roe, 7, tries out the augmented reality system that shows what the finished Apple Park will look like at the opening of the Apple Park Visitor Center on November 17, 2017 in Cupertino, California.
AMY OSBORNE/AFP/Getty Images

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From iPhone trackers to television parental controls that censor the content that kids watch, parents these days have a lot of technological options if they want to surveil their children’s lives – but to what extent should they?

That’s the theme explored in “Arkangel,” a recent episode of the sci fi show “Black Mirror,” in which a mother has her child implanted with a tracker that allows her to monitor her daughter’s location, censor stressful situations and even see from her point-of-view.  

https://www.youtube.com/embed/yef_HfQoBd8

Of course, putting a tracker inside a child’s skull comes with complex ethical implications, but even parents today have the ability to monitor their children and intervene in their lives in technological ways that weren’t available before.

When does monitoring your child through technology cross a boundary? How did you decide to what extent to surveil your child or censor the content they see? How does this impact the child-parent trust relationship and how do those boundaries change as toddlers turn into teens?

We talk to a psychologist and take your stories and questions, at 866-893-5722.

Guest:

Kaveri Subrahmanyam, chair of the Department of Child and Family Studies and professor of psychology at Cal State L.A. and associate director of the Children's Digital Media Center at UCLA / Cal State L.A.