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Whether during the homeless count or in your daily work, how has working with the homeless changed your perceptions of homelessness?




A homeless woman sleeps on a pile of belongings on the street near the Los Angeles Mission on December 22, 2017 in Los Angeles, California.
A homeless woman sleeps on a pile of belongings on the street near the Los Angeles Mission on December 22, 2017 in Los Angeles, California.
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

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The annual three-day Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count concluded last week, with a turnout of 8,608 volunteers who documented how many people they saw living in the streets.

The results of the count won’t be known until Spring, but today we’re asking listeners who participated in the count to share their experiences. In an interview with the New York Times, volunteer Margaret Ecker described the process of imagining where she might rest in the dark if she were homeless, saying it was “a surprising experience of intimacy...Exercising imagination to do that brought the whole thing much closer than walking past it, or signing a petition, or serving at a soup kitchen.”

If you participated in the homeless count this year, whether for umpteenth time or the first, what was your experience? If you work with the homeless, how have your interactions and perceptions about homelessness changed over time?

Call us at 866-893-5722.

Guest:

Keith Hendriksen, program manager at Union Station Homeless Services in Pasadena; he coordinated the professional teams for Pasadena’s Homeless Count last Wednesday