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As Facebook changes its algorithm, a deep dive on how that affects your newsfeed




A employee eats lunch in the canteen at Facebook's new headquarters in central London on December 4, 2017.
A employee eats lunch in the canteen at Facebook's new headquarters in central London on December 4, 2017.
DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images

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Facebook plans to unveil a new algorithm where posts from friends and family will show up in its News Feed.

That means you’ll see less Tasty videos and other news from brands and publications. The idea is to promote more meaningful interactions between users. While people on Facebook may spend more time scrolling, they aren’t connecting the way they used to.

In an announcement on Monday, Facebook stated that it would “also prioritize local news so that you can see topics that have a direct impact on you and your community and discover what’s happening in your local area.” But the New York Times reported that in October, a new version of the News Feed was tested in Bolivia and showed that changes increased fake news traffic because it limited the nongovernmental news source audience. Facebook says this new version is not identical to the one tested in Bolivia in October.

So could the changes in Facebook’s News Feed breed fake news? And how much should social media dictate what news we see?

Guests:

Josh Constine, editor-at-large for TechCrunch who’s been following the story; he tweets @JoshConstine

Sheera Frenkel, San Francisco-based cyber security correspondent for the New York Times; she wrote “In Some Countries, Facebook’s Fiddling Has Magnified Fake News”; she tweets @sheeraf

Elizabeth Dwoskin, Silicon Valley Correspondent for The Washington Post; she’s been following the story; she tweets @lizzadwoskin