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After house votes to release Nunes memo, the political and national security ramifications of making it public




Former FBI Director Andrew McCabe at a hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee in the Hart Senate Office Building on May 11, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Former FBI Director Andrew McCabe at a hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee in the Hart Senate Office Building on May 11, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Alex Wong/Getty Images

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Lawmakers in Washington D.C. are preparing for tonight’s State of the Union address from President Trump, but much of the attention is being sucked up by the so-called “Nunes memo,” a three and a half page classified document that is alleged to show FBI misconduct into the Russia investigation.

Monday night, the House Intelligence Committee voted to release the memo despite warnings from the Department of Justice that doing so would be “extraordinarily reckless.

One of the reported contentions in the memo is that the so-called “Steele Dossier” was the basis of the FBI’s request to eavesdrop on a Trump campaign official. Republicans are highly critical of using what they call an unsubstantiated and politically motivated hit piece as the basis for a FISA warrant. But it’s the release of the memo itself that’s become its own controversy.

Additionally, in the wake of FBI deputy director Andrew McCabe’s sudden resignation announcement on Monday, there is some speculation that a Sunday trip that FBI director Christopher Wray took to Capitol Hill, where he supposedly read the Nunes memo, may have been the impetus behind McCabe stepping down.

Guests:

Adam Schiff, U.S. Congressman (D-Burbank) representing California’s 28th district which stretches from West Hollywood through Eagle Rock, and from Echo Park to the Angeles National Forest

Sean T. Walsh, Republican political analyst and partner at Wilson Walsh Consulting in San Francisco; he is a former adviser to California Governors Pete Wilson and Arnold Schwarzenegger and a former White House staffer for Presidents Reagan and H.W. Bush