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Should ICE agents be making arrests at courthouses?




A  U.S. Customs and Border Protection patch is displayed on the sleeve of Ronald D. Vitiello, Acting Deputy Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), as he speaks during a Department of Homeland Security press conference on December 5, 2017 in Washington, DC.
A U.S. Customs and Border Protection patch is displayed on the sleeve of Ronald D. Vitiello, Acting Deputy Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), as he speaks during a Department of Homeland Security press conference on December 5, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

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On Wednesday, Federal immigration authorities formalized policy to send ICE agents to courthouses to arrest specific immigrants.

ICE said it would not make sweeps and would instead target specific individuals, and that a courthouse is a safe and convenient place for its agents to do their work. But critics say the policy creates an atmosphere of fear among people affected by crime and family members, and breaks the trust that should exist between crime victims, law enforcement and courts.

Are courthouses a suitable location for ICE agents to be making arrests? Is this formalized policy a pushback on recent sanctuary state policies? Will it affect anything?  

Guests:

Claude Arnold, a consultant at Frontier Solutions, a crisis management firm based in LA; he is also a retired special agent in charge of U.S. ICE investigations at their LA office

Michael Kaufman, deputy director of advocacy and senior staff attorney specializing in immigrants’ rights at the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Southern California