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Pelosi’s 8-hour ‘DACA-buster’: her intention, the impact and what it says about the Democratic divide over immigration




House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) (3rd L) talks to reporters while announcing the House Democrats' new infrastructure plan during a news conference with (L-R) Rep. Bobby Scott (D-VA), Rep. Elizabeth Esty (D-CT) and Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ) at the U.S. Capitol February 8, 2018 in Washington, DC.
House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) (3rd L) talks to reporters while announcing the House Democrats' new infrastructure plan during a news conference with (L-R) Rep. Bobby Scott (D-VA), Rep. Elizabeth Esty (D-CT) and Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ) at the U.S. Capitol February 8, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

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Congress is set to vote on another temporary budget bill. It would increase military spending, among other things, but leaves out a proposal to potentially provide legal status to millions of so-called “dreamers,” those who came to the country illegally as children.

The lack of a DACA deal is dividing members of the Democratic Party. On Wednesday, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi spoke for more than eight hours on the floor in a plea for GOP action on immigration.

The 77-year-old congresswoman wore 4-inch heels and took no breaks, only pausing to sip water.

Many Democrats who were previously critical of Pelosi’s leadership were won over by her grit on the House floor. But some were critical of the speech as a way to break a budget deal.

Sen. Jon Tester (D-Mont.) told the Washington Post that he would back the budget if it included disaster relief funds to help his state recover from recent wildfires, and to “take what you can get.”

We speak to Post reporter David Weigel on the latest and also hear from a Democratic strategist for analysis on the party’s divide.

Guest:

David Weigel, reporter covering politics for the Washington Post; he tweets @daveweigel

Roger Salazar, Democratic strategist and president of ALZA strategies; he’s worked as a spokesperson and communications strategist for a number of national and state offices including the Clinton Administration and Attorney General Xavier Becerra