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After the Florida shooting, a look at whether videos hurt or help investigations




A finger is posed next to the Snapchat app logo on an iPad on August 3, 2016 in London, England.
A finger is posed next to the Snapchat app logo on an iPad on August 3, 2016 in London, England.
Carl Court/Getty Images

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There’s been a lot of controversy surrounding the videos taken during the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Parkland, Florida.

As CNN reported, a student shot video of classmates who were hiding in their classroom as the gunman opened fire. News outlets advise viewer discretion, but there are questions about whether these videos should be shown at all, and what the rules are in obtaining clips from minors.

On the law enforcement side, it’s unclear whether videos could help improve future tactics in active shooter situations, or reveal game plans that are best kept secret. And what does video use mean for investigations?

Larry speaks to a panel of law, media ethics and security experts to find out more about the growing use of videos taken during shootings.

Guests:

Todd M. Keil, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security, from 2009 to 2012); for 23 years, he was a special agent with the US Department of State’s Diplomatic Security Service

Jane Kirtley, professor of media ethics and law at the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Minnesota

Larry Rosenthal, professor in the Fowler School of Law at Chapman University and a former federal prosecutor