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Kasich sees the possibility of a multiparty system in the US. Really?




Gov. John Kasich (R) (R-OH) speaks as Gov. John Hickenlooper (L) (D-CO) listens during a press conference February 23, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Gov. John Kasich (R) (R-OH) speaks as Gov. John Hickenlooper (L) (D-CO) listens during a press conference February 23, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Win McNamee/Getty Images

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Ohio Governor John Kasich (R), speculated Sunday about an end to the two-party system in the U.S.

Kasich, a former Republican presidential candidate said on ABC This Week that he’s “starting to really wonder if we are going to see a multiparty system at some point in the future in this country because I don't think either party is answering people's deepest concerns and needs.”

Kasich’s political motives aside, it’s no secret that there’s been a splintering within the Democratic and Republican parties. The Trump and Bernie supporters challenged the status quo in 2016, and part of that result was Trump’s presidency.

But is a truly competitive multi-party system really viable? Not only would there have to be serious money behind a third-party candidate, but the support would have to be sustained over time, and include mobilization from all 50 states.

So what has been the historical impact of third-party candidates in presidential races? Larry speaks to two professors on opposite sides of the aisle today, for a look back at third party leaders and if we can really expect an eventual shift to a multi-party system in the U.S.

Guests:

Derek Muller, associate professor of law at Pepperdine, where his focus includes election law, and the role of states in elections; he tweets @derektmuller ‏

Robert Shrum, political science professor and chair in practical politics at USC; he’s an expert in presidential elections, and political advertising and policy



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