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It’s been 5 years – whatever happened to Sheryl Sandberg’s ‘Lean In’ movement?




Facebook's Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg speaks during a public conversation on Facebook's work at The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research on June 22, 2016 in Washington, DC.
Facebook's Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg speaks during a public conversation on Facebook's work at The American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research on June 22, 2016 in Washington, DC.
Allison Shelley/Getty Images

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Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg launched a feminist movement in 2013 when she released “Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead.”

The book dove into the reasons why women were underrepresented in government and industry leadership positions and offered solutions to help them reach their full professional potential. Sandberg discussed work-life balance, mentorship, the wage gap and, most of all, the importance of “leaning in” to actively seek leadership roles at work.

Though a “Lean In” community still exists in “circles” – small groups that meet regularly to support each other in professional goals – the movement has largely faded from prominence and a new one has taken its place. #MeToo has shifted the conversation around female empowerment in the workplace from gaining representation in leadership roles to ensuring basic safety from sexual harassment and assault.

Five years after Sandberg told women to “Lean In,” AirTalk wants to hear from you. What did the book mean to you when it came out? Did you listen and “lean in”? What happened if you did? And do you feel like there has been any movement in your industry to increase the number of women in leadership?

With guest host Libby Denkmann.

Guests:

Lori Mackenzie, executive director of the Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University, where she is co-founder of the Center for the Advancement of Women's Leadership

Christine Williams, professor of sociology at the University of Texas, Austin; she has written many books on gender in the workplace, including “Still a Man's World: Men Who Do Women's Work” (University of California Press, 1995)