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Stormy Daniels’ attorney seeks for Trump to testify in deposition – will the court allow it and what implications would it have?




Actress Stephanie Clifford, who uses the stage name Stormy Daniels, arrives to perform at the Solid Gold Fort Lauderdale strip club on March 9, 2018 in Pompano Beach, Florida.
Actress Stephanie Clifford, who uses the stage name Stormy Daniels, arrives to perform at the Solid Gold Fort Lauderdale strip club on March 9, 2018 in Pompano Beach, Florida.
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

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An attorney for Stormy Daniels filed a motion Wednesday seeking to question President Donald Trump and his attorney under oath about a pre-election payment to the porn actress aimed at keeping her quiet about an alleged tryst with Trump.

If successful, it would be the first deposition of a sitting president since Bill Clinton in 1998 had to answer questions about his conduct with women.

Attorney Michael Avenatti is seeking sworn testimony from Trump and Trump's personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, about a $130,000 payment made to Daniels days before the 2016 presidential election as part of a nondisclosure agreement she is seeking to invalidate. Avenatti's documents were filed in U.S. District Court in California.

Avenatti wants to question Trump and Cohen for "no more than two hours." In the filing, he says the depositions are needed to establish if Trump knew about the payment, which he refers to as a "hush agreement," and if he consented to it.

Will the deposition move forward? What questions would be asked of Trump and Cohen? And what would be the implications?

With files from the Associated Press.

Guest:

Zachary Clopton, assistant professor of law at Cornell Law School; one of his specialties is civil procedure; he has served as an Assistant United States Attorney in Chicago