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It’s been nearly half a year since #MeToo gained traction. Has it changed attitudes at work?




People work at computers in TechHub, an office space for technology start-up entrepreneurs, near the Old Street roundabout in Shoreditch which has been dubbed 'Silicon Roundabout' due to the number of technology companies operating from the area on March 15, 2011 in London, England.
People work at computers in TechHub, an office space for technology start-up entrepreneurs, near the Old Street roundabout in Shoreditch which has been dubbed 'Silicon Roundabout' due to the number of technology companies operating from the area on March 15, 2011 in London, England.
Oli Scarff/Getty Images

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It’s been nearly six months since the sexual harassment allegations against Harvey Weinstein came to the fore of public and media attention, launching the #MeToo movement which has reverberated far past the entertainment industry – but has it shifted attitudes in the workplace?

According to a new survey from the Pew Research Center, 51 percent of people surveyed thought #MeToo has made it more difficult for men to know how to interact with women at work, and few see an upside for women, with 51 percent saying it won’t make a difference and 20 percent saying it will lead to fewer career opportunities.

The survey breaks down beliefs by gender, generation and political party affiliation. For example, 28 percent of Republican or Republican-leaning men think it’s a big problem to have men get away with sexual harassment and for women to not be believed, compared to 58 percent of men who identify as Democrat.

Larry Mantle sits down with one of the researchers who put together the survey. Plus, we want to hear from you. How has the #MeToo movement changed behavior and outlook at work? Has it made it more difficult for men to interact with women? Has it been beneficial to women in the workplace?

Guest:

Juliana Horowitz, associate director for social trends research at the Pew Research Center; she worked on the survey “Sexual Harassment at Work in the Era of #MeToo” survey; she tweets @jmhorowitz78