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To curb homelessness, LA law would let some housing projects skip environmental review




Construction workers work  beside new apartment buildings in downtown Los Angeles, California on April 5, 2017.
Construction workers work beside new apartment buildings in downtown Los Angeles, California on April 5, 2017.
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

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In a unanimous vote Wednesday, the Los Angeles City Council gave the green light to two laws meant to create more homeless housing.

As the Los Angeles Times reports, one of the laws would allow certain housing projects to avoid environmental reviews in order to speed up the construction process. It would also cut down on costs to build the structures. An estimated 200 additional units would go up each year, with 10,000 units estimated to be built in a decade.

While homeless advocates lauded the plan, neighborhood groups were opposed, saying the ordinance would remove protections from residents.

Larry speaks to a Venice resident and the president of the L.A. City Planning Commission for a lively debate on the new ordinance.

Guests:

David Ambroz, president of the Los Angeles City Planning Commission

Christian Wrede, member of Venice Vision, a neighborhood group that aims to create a safe and livable community; the organization is opposed to the ordinance