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Starbucks is closing 8,000 stores for discrimination training. So how do you determine implicit bias in the workplace?




Protestor Soren Mcclay, 14, (C) demonstrates outside a Center City Starbucks on April 15, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Protestor Soren Mcclay, 14, (C) demonstrates outside a Center City Starbucks on April 15, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Mark Makela/Getty Images

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Starbucks is closing some 8,000 of its locations in May for implicit bias training, after a store manager in Philadelphia called the cops that led to the arrests of two black men.

The coffee giant is widely criticized for what happened. This morning, the company’s executive chairman Howard Schultz appeared on CBS This Morning for a sit down with co-host Gayle King. Schultz told King in the interview that the store manager at the center of the controversy has “left the company.”

“I think you have to say in looking at the tape that she demonstrated her own level of unconscious bias,” Schultz went on to say. “And in looking at the tape, you ask yourself whether or not that was racial profiling.”

How is implicit bias determined from a human resource standpoint?  

Guest:

Sue Bendavid, chair of the employment law department and attorney at Lewitt Hackman in Los Angeles; the firm represents companies and employers