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A new study says the San Andreas fault isn’t the most dangerous in CA




The western span of the San Francisco Bay Bridge and San Francisco skyline seen November 2, 2001.
The western span of the San Francisco Bay Bridge and San Francisco skyline seen November 2, 2001.
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

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A new report from the U.S. Geological Survey shows that there’s a more dangerous, though lesser known, fault running through densely populated areas of the East Bay.

In the event of a magnitude 7 earthquake, nearly 800 people could be killed, with an injury estimate of 18,000.

What precautions can the region take to avoid a potential disaster? We discuss the new study with its lead author and examine the economic impact of a potential East Bay quake.

Guests:

Ken Hudnut, lead author on The HayWired Earthquake Scenario, a study on the
Hayward fault; geophysicist and science advisor for risk reduction for the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS)

Anne Wein, co-author of The HayWired Earthquake Scenario study; disaster and resilient analyst, and a principal investigator with the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in the Western Geographic Science Center in California