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In light of Central American migrants reaching border, we get a primer on asylum law




Pro-migrant caravan demonstrators rally at the west end of the U.S.-Mexico border as pro-migrant demonstrators climb the border wall from the Mexican side on April 29, 2018 in San Diego, California.
Pro-migrant caravan demonstrators rally at the west end of the U.S.-Mexico border as pro-migrant demonstrators climb the border wall from the Mexican side on April 29, 2018 in San Diego, California.
Bill Wechter/Getty Images

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After nearly a month of travel, a group of 200 migrants from Central America who were traveling with the so-called caravan reached the U.S. border on Sunday and are seeking asylum.

They were told by border inspectors that there was no room to accommodate them in the processing facilities, so many of them camped the night at the border, saying they would not leave until they were able to enter the country.

Migrants can ask for asylum at any entry port along the border of the U.S. and usually have to pass an interview in which border officials assess whether they have credible fears of returning to their home countries. Afterwards, they are often taken into custody, and screened by multiple officials in a process that takes months.

We get the latest from the border, plus how does the asylum process work? What criteria does a migrant have to meet in order to qualify for asylum? How is the situation with the “caravan” likely to play out?

GUESTS:

Daniel González, immigration reporter covering the story at the border today for The Arizona Republic; the paper is part of the USA Today Network; he tweets @azdangonzalez

Carrie Kahn, international correspondent for NPR based in Tijuana today; she tweets @ckahn

Bill Hing, professor of law and director of The Immigration and Deportation Defense Clinic at University of San Francisco School of Law