Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

As Kilauea eruption forces evacuations, a look at the latest from Hawaii




In this photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, red ash rises from the Puu Oo vent on Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano after a magnitude 5.0 earthquake struck the Big Island, Thursday, May 3, 2018 in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.
In this photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, red ash rises from the Puu Oo vent on Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano after a magnitude 5.0 earthquake struck the Big Island, Thursday, May 3, 2018 in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.
Kevan Kamibayashi/U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Listen to story

16:03
Download this story 7.0MB

Nearly 1,500 residents were ordered to evacuate after Kilauea volcano erupted in Hawaii late Thursday afternoon and released lava into a residential area. 

A crack in Kilauea volcano's rift zone erupted, spurting lava in Leilani Estates, a subdivision in the lower East Rift Zone of Kilauea volcano. Volcano officials said they couldn't predict how long the eruption might last. The eruption occurred hours after a 5.0 magnitude earthquake hit the Big Island. Kilauea’s Puu Oo’ cone has been continuously erupting since 1983.

We speak to a Honolulu reporter and a volcanologist for more on the past and present of Kilauea.

Guests:

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi, reporter for Hawaii Public Radio KHPR who is reporting from the Big Island in Hawaii

Wendy Stovall, deputy scientist-in-charge at the U.S.Geological Survey’s Yellowstone Volcano Observatory; she studied Kilauea in Hawaii from 2005-2009