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Remembering Richard Feynman: the pioneering physicist turns 100




Richard Feynman (center) at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the Manhattan Project.
Richard Feynman (center) at Los Alamos National Laboratory during the Manhattan Project.
Los Alamos National Laboratory

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Widely considered one of the most brilliant physicists since Albert Einstein, Richard P. Feynman would have turned 100 this Friday, May 11.

He was known for his work and innovation in theoretical physics, quantum mechanics and particle physics, as well as for developing the field of quantum computing. During WWII, he helped develop the atomic bomb, and in the 1980s he was on the panel that investigated the Space Shuttle Challenger explosion. As well as being a Nobel prize-winner, he was also known for his books, such as “Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!” and “What Do You Care What Other People Think?” He was also perhaps unconventional for a physicist of his caliber, recreationally experimenting with drugs and frequenting topless bars.

We look back at the career, innovations and life of Feynman with two people who knew him well: a former colleague and his daughter.

Guests:

Kip Thorne, Richard P. Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics, Emeritus at Caltech, 2017 Nobel Laureate and Feynman’s former colleague

Michelle Feynman, daughter of Richard Feynman