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The latest on Kilauea’s potential explosion, and evacuations in Hawaii’s Big Island




A column of robust, reddish-brown ash plume occurred after a magnitude 6.9 South Flank following the eruption of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano on May 4, 2018.
A column of robust, reddish-brown ash plume occurred after a magnitude 6.9 South Flank following the eruption of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano on May 4, 2018.
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After Kilauea’s eruption last week, the volcano on Hawaii’s Big Island is posing a new threat--an explosion.

As reported by CBS News, toxic steam and lava have been released from Kilauea, and on Thursday, news broke that the volcano cold potentially explode, sending large pieces of rock up to half-a-mile. Lava is reaching groundwater levels, which could in turn, trigger pressurized steam, which would cause Kilaua to literally blow its top. The last time this happened was in 1924.

Larry speaks to a reporter close to evacuations in Leilani Estates and a volcanologist to break down the latest on the story.

Guests:

Ku'uwehi Hiraishi, reporter for KHPR, Hawaii Public Radio; she is currently in the Puna, a district that encompasses Leilani Estates on Hawaii’s Big Island

Weston Thelen, research seismologist and volcanologist at U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Science Center in Vancouver, Washington; he studied Kilauea at the Hawaii Volcano Observatory from 2011 to 2016