Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Proposed ballot initiative wants to protect your data, but some tech companies say it will lead to job losses




After Facebook CEO and co-founder Mark Zuckerberg spoke to Congress about a massive data breach, the company announced it would no longer fund an effort to oppose The Consumer Right to Privacy Act.
After Facebook CEO and co-founder Mark Zuckerberg spoke to Congress about a massive data breach, the company announced it would no longer fund an effort to oppose The Consumer Right to Privacy Act.
Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Listen to story

28:55
Download this story 13.0MB

The Cambridge Analytica scandal brought renewed scrutiny to how internet companies access, collect and use your data, as well as calls from consumer advocates for more stringent regulations.

One such call comes from a new proposed initiative, likely to appear on the November ballot: The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018. The initiative has three components: it gives consumers the right to ask companies for the data they’ve collected on them, it gives consumers the power to stop companies from selling or sharing the data with third parties for business reasons and it lets consumers the power to sue or fine a company that doesn’t comply.

Proponents say this would be a huge step towards protecting consumers from internet giants, but opponents, which include Google, AT&T and California’s Chamber of Commerce, have come out against the initiative. They say that it’s overly broad and that it jeopardizes the economic model that sustains the internet, and will in turn slow down California’s tech sector and endanger jobs. The opposition campaign is called “The Committee to Protect California Jobs.”

Facebook was initially a funder of this Committee, but withdrew support in April, after Mark Zuckerberg’s Congressional testimony.

Is this a much needed check on largely unregulated internet companies? Or would this initiative unnecessarily sandbag the tech sector which has contributed to California’s booming economy? And how will having these California-specific regulations affect the national landscape?

Ready for Election Day? Get up to speed on what you need to know with KPCC’s Voter Game Plan. Read up on the candidates and ballot measures, find out about registration deadlines and ask us your questions.

Guests:

Rick Arney, co-author of the California Consumer Privacy Act

Robert Callahan, vice president of state government affairs at the Internet Association, a national trade organization that lobbies on behalf of internet companies; he is one of the co-chairs of the “The Committee to Protect California Jobs,” the opposition campaign to the California Consumer Privacy Act



You care about today's news. And you're not alone.

Join others who support independent journalism.