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FDA greenlights first preventative migraine drug. How does it work?




1819: A man suffering from a headache is tormented by a horde of little demons.  'Headache' by Cruikshank.
1819: A man suffering from a headache is tormented by a horde of little demons. 'Headache' by Cruikshank.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

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On Thursday, the Food and Drug Administration approved Aimovig, a first-of-its kind drug designed to prevent crippling migraines.

The injection device resembles an insulin pen, and its manufacturers, Amgen and Novartis, expect it to be available for patients within the next week. Three additional companies are also awaiting FDA approval for similar medications.

An estimated 38 million Americans suffer from migraines each year. So what’s new about Aimovig and does it appear to be promising? Will it be cost effective? If you’re a doctor who specializes in treatment for chronic headaches and migraines, what’s your response to the new medication? Call us at 866-893-5722.

Guest:

Nada Hindiyeh, M.D., clinical assistant professor of neurology and neurological sciences at Stanford University’s Headache and Facial Pain Program; she specializes in chronic migraines and treatments for headache disorders