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As San Francisco considers supervised drug injection sites, we debate the impact




A client of the Insite supervised injection Center in Vancouver, Canada, collects her kit on May 3, 2011.
A client of the Insite supervised injection Center in Vancouver, Canada, collects her kit on May 3, 2011.
AFP/AFP/Getty Images

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San Francisco is considering opening the first “supervised injection site” in the nation, a place where addicts can bring their own drugs and inject them under the care of a trained medical staff.

San Francisco workers reportedly collect more than 287,000 syringes from streets and alleys each month. The move aims to reduce the number of overdoses and infections that spread through shared needles.

But skeptics say the city would be enabling drug users. According to a statement by the Drug Enforcement Administration, the plan would violate the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). Anyone using such sites could face prosecution as it would be against federal law. So would supervised injection sites enable drug users or would it help them seek care?

Call us at 866-893-5722.

Guests:

Laura Thomas, acting director of the California chapter of the Drug Policy Alliance, a drug law reform advocacy group; she’s been advocating for the San Francisco injection site for the past decade

Ron Allen, head of the International Faith Based Coalition, a drug prevention group in Sacramento