Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

As Starbucks closes stores for implicit bias training today, experts differ on its utility and effectiveness




The sign for a Starbucks Coffee shop is seen in New York on April 17, 2018, following the company's announcement that they will close more than 8,000 US stores on May 29 to conduct
The sign for a Starbucks Coffee shop is seen in New York on April 17, 2018, following the company's announcement that they will close more than 8,000 US stores on May 29 to conduct "racial-bias education" following the arrest of two black men in one of its cafes.
HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP/Getty Images

Listen to story

13:41
Download this story 6.0MB

Starbucks is set to close 8,000 of its stores nationwide on Tuesday for employee “racial-bias education.”

The company said up to 180,000 employees will receive training from a "tool kit" that will "focus on understanding prejudice and the history of public accommodations in the United States."

The move came in response to an arrest of two African American men at a Philadelphia Starbucks last month. The men, who said they were waiting for a friend, were arrested for trespassing and taken away in handcuffs.

Is the anti-bias training the answer to such incidents of racial discrimination? While Starbucks thinks so, some critics question the very idea of implicit bias -- and whether this kind of training is effective.

For a preview of the curriculum Starbucks is planning to share with its employees on Tuesday, click here.

Guests:

Erin Thomas, partner at the Chicago office of Paradigm, a diversity and inclusion strategy firm that advises companies on cultivating inclusive cultures; she tweets @ErinThomasPhD

Hal Arkes, professor emeritus of psychology at Ohio State University who has done research on the topic of implicit bias