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How CA Republicans might influence immigration votes, plus the legality of Trump’s executive order




People display signs at the Tornillo Port of Entry near El Paso, Texas, June 21, 2018 during a protest rally including several American mayors against the US administration's family separation policy.
People display signs at the Tornillo Port of Entry near El Paso, Texas, June 21, 2018 during a protest rally including several American mayors against the US administration's family separation policy.
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images

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President Donald Trump abruptly reversed himself Wednesday and signed an executive order halting his administration's policy of separating children from their parents when they are detained illegally crossing the U.S. border.

The order does not end the "zero-tolerance" policy that criminally prosecutes all adults caught crossing the border illegally. But it would keep families together while they are in custody, expedite their cases and ask the Defense Department to help house them.

But the Flores agreement from 1997, which establishes standards about whether and how minors can be detained, might present legal issues for Trump’s executive order. We parse those legal questions, and dive into what happened during a similar situation under the Obama administration.

Meanwhile, the House is voting on several immigration bills today, the “Goodlatte” bill and the “compromise” bill. If the bills fail, Republicans in vulnerable seats, including those in California, such as Rep. Jeff Dunham, might flout GOP establishment and resurrect some sort of compromise legislation with Democrats. We get the latest on the California politics piece of the House votes series happening today.

With files from the Associated Press.

With guest host Libby Denkmann.

Guests:

Kate Irby, congressional reporter for the news organization, McClatchy, who has been reporting on the immigration bills; she tweets @kateirby

Pratheepan Gulasekaram, professor of law at Santa Clara Law, where he specializes in constitutional and immigration law