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As South Korean women protest ‘spycam porn,’ we look at what is driving the phenomenon




Female protesters call for South Korea's government to crack down on widespread spycam porn crimes during a rally in Seoul on July 7, 2018.
Female protesters call for South Korea's government to crack down on widespread spycam porn crimes during a rally in Seoul on July 7, 2018.
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Thousands of South Korean women gathered in Seoul on Saturday to demand stronger government action to fight the spread of intimate photos and video taken by hidden cameras, which they say has women living in constant anxiety and distress.

Police said about 18,000 took part in the women-only protest, with demonstrators calling for stronger investigations and punishments against male offenders who photograph or film women without their knowledge and post the material online.

The protesters spoke out against an environment in which women constantly worry about tiny cameras hidden in bathrooms or being filmed from under their skirts at subway stations. South Korea has struggled over the years to deal with perpetrators who use cameras and smartphones to film under women's clothing to see their genitals or underwear, then circulate the footage on illicit porn sites.

Since 2004, South Korea has required smartphones to make large shutter sounds when taking pictures and videos to prevent such crimes. However, phone cameras can be silenced through apps and there's also an abundance of other discreet cameras still on the market.

Have you experienced similar violations here at home or overseas? Call us at 866-893-5722 and share your story.  

With files from the Associated Press

Guest:

Ju Hui Judy Han, assistant professor of gender studies at UCLA, where her research focus includes Asian studies, social change, gender and sexuality



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