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California men’s rights groups are taking ladies’ nights to court




A member of staff cleans the ornate men's toilets in the Philharmonic Dining Rooms in Liverpool, north west England on November 15, 2017.
A member of staff cleans the ornate men's toilets in the Philharmonic Dining Rooms in Liverpool, north west England on November 15, 2017.
PAUL ELLIS/AFP/Getty Images

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There’s a loose coalition of men’s rights activists in California who are challenging female-centric businesses and marketing strategies, citing discrimination against men via the California Unruh Civil Rights Act.

This 1959 piece of state legislation applies to all businesses and outlaws discrimination based on a number of categories, including sex.

So what about an all-ladies networking night at a club or a Wednesday night bar special where women can get a free drink? These are the types of practices that are being challenged by these groups, who follow the Civil Rights test case tradition and send men to be turned away at these events.

In her latest piece for the New York Times, Katie Rosman profiles some of the men in this movement and examines whether the law is on their side. Are they being discriminated against? Can women-focused events legally defend their legitimacy?

With guest host Libby Denkmann.

Guests:

Katie Rosman, reporter for the New York Times; her recent piece is “A Fight for Men’s Rights, in California Courts”; she tweets @katierosman

Diane Klein, professor of law at University of La Verne, where her areas of expertise include civil rights and anti-discrimination law