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How a CA lawsuit could make police officers think twice before getting involved in a car chase




A police car is seen at the unveiling of two new Ford Fusion hybrid pursuit-rated Police Responder cars at Los Angeles Police Department headquarters on April 10, 2017 in Los Angeles, California.
A police car is seen at the unveiling of two new Ford Fusion hybrid pursuit-rated Police Responder cars at Los Angeles Police Department headquarters on April 10, 2017 in Los Angeles, California.
David McNew/Getty Images

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The California Supreme Court is set to decide on whether to move forward with a case that aims to make police departments culpable in accidents that occur during car chases.

The case goes back to 2015, when a Gardena officer pursued a truck driven by a man suspected of armed robbery. The officer struck the truck at 50 mph while attempting a pursuit intervention technique (PIT), a maneuver that is potentially lethal when conducted at speeds more than 35 mph. A passenger in the truck, Mark Gamar, was killed, and his mother then sued the Gardena Police Department.

Law enforcement groups are watching the case closely, because if the court decides to pursue it there’s a good chance that it will spark more lawsuits from individuals seeking compensation after having been involved in police chase accidents.

With guest host Libby Denkmann.

Guest:

Jeff Noble, police practices consultant and former deputy chief of police of the Irvine Police Department