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Should LAPD put an end to predictive policing?




Los Angeles Police Sergeant Raul Jovel enters data in a field report after making a stop on E. 28th St. to check on some metro officers who were doing a search at a home on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 in Los Angeles, Calif.
Los Angeles Police Sergeant Raul Jovel enters data in a field report after making a stop on E. 28th St. to check on some metro officers who were doing a search at a home on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 in Los Angeles, Calif.
Susanica Tam for KPCC

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Controversy is brewing over the Los Angeles Police Department use of data through the so-called predictive policing program.

The department uses software technology to fight crimes in certain neighborhoods by analyzing data. Operation LASER and PrepPol, both began in 2011, are the two most criticized programs. Critics argue that racial profiling is central to such technology. At a Police Commission meeting on Tuesday, activists and civil liberty groups engaged in a heated debate with the department over its use of such program.

Opponents argue that the programs can lead to discrimination against minority groups. Certain information, they argue, such as parolee data and gang member identification allows the LAPD to racially profile using proxy data, because Latinos and blacks represent a high percentage of those tracked groups.

Among those opposing the police department's data-driven program are the American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California and Stop LAPD Spying Coalition, a watchdog group that studies police surveillance and has accused the police department of racial profiling. Meanwhile, the LAPD said race is not used directly in the data.

Should the LAPD put an end to its predictive policing program?

With guest host Libby Denkmann

NOTE: AirTalk contacted the Los Angeles Police Department and invited them to participate in the conversation, but they declined our request.

Guest:

Hamid Khan, organizer with Stop LAPD Spying Coalition, a watchdog group that studies police surveillance and has accused the police department of racial profiling