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We look inside the mind of an arsonist and what have we learned from past devastating wildfires




IDYLLWILD, CA - JULY 26:  Firefighters work as the Cranston Fire burns in San Bernardino National Forest on July 26, 2018 near Idyllwild, California. Fire crews are battling the 4,700-acre fire in the midst of a heat wave.  (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
IDYLLWILD, CA - JULY 26: Firefighters work as the Cranston Fire burns in San Bernardino National Forest on July 26, 2018 near Idyllwild, California. Fire crews are battling the 4,700-acre fire in the midst of a heat wave. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
Mario Tama/Getty Images

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A series of wildfires broke out in California in 2003 that burned 1,020,460 acres of land.

Fire leaders, firefighter union representatives and federal officials convened to figure out what went wrong in the deadly Southern California wildfires. The Blue-Ribbon Fire Commission, a group appointed to investigate, issued a 232-page report that detailed California’s wildfire danger. The 18-member panel suggested ways to prevent similar disasters.

They concluded unless protection of life takes priority over political agendas, tragedies such as the series of wildfires that broke in 2003 will continue to occur. Many recommendations on battling wildfires followed.

Today, in the wake of Ferguson and Cranston fires, we check in on how far we’ve come in this fight. How did we benefit from recommendations that were presented by the blue-ribbon panel? We also look at arsonists, who have played a big role in igniting many of those wildfires; and examine with a forensic psychologist what goes on inside the mind of an arsonist.

With guest host Alex Cohen

Guests:

Carroll Wills, communications director at the California Professional Firefighters, a labor union representing professional firefighters and departments throughout California.

Alex Yufik, forensic psychologist and criminal defense attorney