Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Hunting — an American story of the beloved and berated sport




Captain Clark and his men shooting bears. Original Artwork: From  'Journal of Voyages' by Peter Gass - pub 1811.
Captain Clark and his men shooting bears. Original Artwork: From 'Journal of Voyages' by Peter Gass - pub 1811.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Listen to story

18:19
Download this story 8.0MB

It’s estimated that only 4 to 6 percent of Americans are active hunters, and yet hunting dominates a whirlwind of debates — from gun control to wildlife preservation to divisions in class and more.

How did hunting become such a sacred yet fraught tradition? Is it in our DNA? Is it love of sport? Or perhaps a desire for independence and self-reliance?

Award-winning historian Philip Dray’s latest book, “The Fair Chase: The Epic Story of Hunting in America” provides a revelatory view into our country’s legendary hunters and evolving attitudes towards wildlife and conservation. The term “Fair Chase” itself refers to a code of hunting ethics inspired by advocates of conservation.

Dray joins host Larry Mantle to talk about the classic, rugged pastime and its indelible impact on American culture.

Guest:

Philip Dray, author of many books including his latest, “The Fair Chase: The Epic Story of Hunting in America” (Basic Books 2018); finalist for the Pulitzer Prize for his 2002 book, “At the Hands of Persons Unknown: The Lynching of Black America” (Modern Library, 2002)