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So, your kid wants to be a stand-up comic: What happens when parents think their kids are chasing an impractical career




When it comes to making decisions, very different types of leaders have at least one thing in common, research suggests.
When it comes to making decisions, very different types of leaders have at least one thing in common, research suggests.
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Imagine you’re the parent (and maybe you are) of a college-bound teenager who comes to you one day and says “I’ve found my calling. I’m going to pursue a career in stand-up comedy.”

How do you react?

Earlier this year in her weekly column “Dear Therapist” in The Atlantic, Los Angeles-based therapist Lori Gottlieb highlights a question from a Georgia mother whose son decided at age 18 that he wanted to pursue a career in stand up comedy.

“We don’t want to be those parents who crush his dream, but we don’t want him living in our basement at 35, getting paid $200 a week to perform at a local club, and finding himself crippled career-wise because he spent years not learning how to make it in the real world,” the mother writes, asking how she and her husband can have their son’s back in pursuing his dream while not pressuring him into feeling like he has to to pursue a college education that could lead to a “real job.”

Have you found yourself in a similar situation, either as the parent of a child you feel is pursuing an impractical career path or as the person having to convince your parents to support the career path you’ve chosen to pursue?

Guest:

Lori Gottlieb, licensed marriage and family therapist based in Los Angeles and author of the weekly column “Dear Therapist” for The Atlantic; she tweets @LoriGottlieb1



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