Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

What teens are really getting out of social media, according to a new study




American kids access the Internet and social media through their phones or a parent's phone every day.
American kids access the Internet and social media through their phones or a parent's phone every day.
/Jiangang Wang/Moment Editorial/Getty Images

Listen to story

26:40
Download this story 12.0MB

There’s a long and growing list of research on how social media consumption impacts adolescence, but at least one thing is clear — our social media landscape has dramatically shifted in recent years.

On Monday, Common Sense Media released a comprehensive follow up to its 2012 report, “Social Media, Social Life: Teens Reveal Their Experiences.” The independent nonprofit surveyed 1,141 teens across the United States age 13 to 17 on their interactions and perceptions of social media use, and the updated findings may surprise or challenge our notions of how constant screen time affects today’s teenagers.

For one, teens are fully aware of how distracting their devices are, a more nuanced takeaway than what was previously believed before, and the ways in which they choose to engage with multiple platforms have also drastically changed. Youngsters opened up about the more serious problems they face online as well, including cyber bullying, racism, sexism and hate speech.

We dive into the results and welcome your comments and questions. Call us at 866-893-5722 or comment below.

Guest:

James Steyer, CEO and founder of Common Sense Media, a San Francisco-based nonprofit working to minimize the harmful effects of media and technology on kids and parents which released the report today