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New census data: Asians lead rise of foreign-born immigrants




A new U.S. citizen holds a flag to his chest during the Pledge of Allegiance during a naturalization ceremony at the New York Public Library, July 3, 2018 in New York City.
A new U.S. citizen holds a flag to his chest during the Pledge of Allegiance during a naturalization ceremony at the New York Public Library, July 3, 2018 in New York City.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

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Yesterday, the Census Bureau released new data showing that the percentage of foreign-born residents is the highest its been since 1910, with the largest demographic coming from Asia.

The data reveals a variety of information involving immigrant residents of the U.S. -- the way they vote (Democrat), where they live (cities), and more.

But naturally, new numbers bring new questions. Why are Asians immigrating to the U.S. at such high rates? How are high levels of foreign-born residents influencing our culture? Our politics?

We analyze with immigration experts.

Guests:

Tyler Anbinder, professor of history at George Washington University who specializes in American politics and immigration; he is also the author of “City of Dreams: The 400-Year Epic History of Immigrant New York” (Mariner Books 2016)

Dowell Myers, demography professor at USC; director, Population Dynamics Research Group at USC, which studies immigration and demographic impact; he tweets @ProfDowellMyers

Karen Umemoto, professor of urban planning and Asian American studies, as well as director of the Asian American Studies Center at UCLA



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