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What happens to the Mueller investigation if Rod Rosenstein leaves the DoJ?




Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein listens as Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh's appears for his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 4, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein listens as Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh's appears for his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee in the Hart Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 4, 2018 in Washington, DC.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

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The White House says President Donald Trump and his embattled Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein spoke on Monday and will meet Thursday at the White House amid uncertainty about Rosenstein's fate.

Rosenstein oversees special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russia election meddling and has been the probe's chief public defender.

The development comes just days after reports that in the days after the firing of FBI Director James Comey, Rosenstein had raised the idea of secretly recording President Donald Trump and of invoking the 25th Amendment to have the Cabinet remove the president from office.

So what’s going to happen if Rosenstein leaves his post? We’ll discuss.

With files from the Associated Press

Guests:

Jeff Mordock, investigative and government reporter for The Washington Times, who’s looked at the chain of succession at Justice Department if Rosenstein is out

Niels Lesniewski, senior writer at Roll Call who has a piece out today looking at the solicitor general Noel Francisco

Matt Barreto, professor of political science and Chicano/a Studies at UCLA and co-founder of the research and polling firm Latino Decisions; he tweets @realMABarreto

Sean T. Walsh, Republican political analyst and partner at Wilson Walsh Consulting in San Francisco; he is a former adviser to California Governors Pete Wilson and Arnold Schwarzenegger and a former White House staffer for Presidents Reagan and H.W. Bush   

Saikrishna Prakash, professor of law at the University of Virginia, whose scholarship focuses on separation of powers, particularly executive powers. He teaches Constitutional Law, Foreign Relations Law and Presidential Powers at the Law School

Justin Levitt, professor of law at Loyola Law School and  former deputy assistant attorney general in the Civil Rights Division of the Justice Department under President Obama; he tweets @_justinlevitt_

John P. Carlin, former Assistant Attorney General for the U.S. Department of Justice's National Security Division from 2014 to 2016; Chief of Staff to Robert Mueller when he was Director of the FBI; partner and chairman of the law firm, Morrison & Foerster's Global Risk and Crisis Management