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How to move past the climate of ultra partisan bitterness after Kavanaugh’s confirmation




Demonstrators protest against the appointment of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh at the Supreme Court in Washington DC, on October 6, 2018.
Demonstrators protest against the appointment of Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh at the Supreme Court in Washington DC, on October 6, 2018.
ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images

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We’ve just come through one of the most divisive periods in American politics in the last several decades.

Unlike most previous disagreements, say over war, this one was super-concentrated into just a few weeks and it centered on the confirmation process for Brett Kavanaugh as Supreme Court justice.

The sexual assault allegations against the now-justice made what was already a highly partisan process into something even more emotionally fraught. Layered on top of disagreements over judge Kavanaugh’s ideological views and judicial record were public disagreements over whether he should be rejected over the allegation. Or over allegations of heavy drinking in his youth and how he characterized it. Or over how he expressed his anger in defending himself against the allegations.

We’d like to know how you’re now dealing with the intense emotions of the process. Are you limiting political comments on social media? Avoiding the topic in conversation with family or friends? Are you in a zone where everyone around you sees the process just as you do? Is that more or less stressful? Call us at 866-893-5722.