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Sorry, Fido’s just not that smart: New study compares intelligence of dogs to other animals




Wilson, a corgi dressed as a Chia Pet, attends Haute Dog Howl'oween Parade on October 29, 2017 in Long Beach, California.
Wilson, a corgi dressed as a Chia Pet, attends Haute Dog Howl'oween Parade on October 29, 2017 in Long Beach, California.
Chelsea Guglielmino/Getty Images

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To the potential dismay of Team Dog, a new study has found that dogs are really no smarter than other animals.

The authors of the study compare the cognition of dogs to animals like wolves, cats, chimpanzees, dolphins, horses and pigeons -- animals from groups that are categorized under “carnivores”, “social hunters” or “domestic animals”. And what researchers found is that dogs do not display superior intelligence compared with animals in these other groups.

Stephen Lea, one of the authors of the study, joins Larry to discuss the findings.

Guest:

Stephen Lea, emeritus professor of psychology at University of Exeter in Britain; co-author of the study, “In what sense are dogs special? Canine cognition in comparative context,” recently published in the journal, “Learning & Behavior”