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After Khashoggi fallout, how should the US proceed with Saudi Arabia?




Protestors hold pictures of missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi during a demonstration in front of the Saudi Arabian consulate, on Friday in Istanbul.
Protestors hold pictures of missing journalist Jamal Khashoggi during a demonstration in front of the Saudi Arabian consulate, on Friday in Istanbul.
Ozan Koze/AFP/Getty Images

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said he told President Donald Trump on Thursday that Saudi Arabia should be given a few more days to complete its investigation into the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi before the U.S. decides “how, or if” to respond.

Pompeo, who spoke with reporters on the White House driveway after briefing Trump on his talks with leaders in Saudi Arabia and Turkey, said Turkey also promised to share the results of its own investigation with the Saudis.

Pompeo said he believes those combined efforts will produce “a complete picture” of what happened to Khashoggi, a Saudi journalist living in the U.S. who had been critical of the kingdom. Khashoggi has not been seen since he entered the Saudi consult in Istanbul more than two weeks ago and is feared dead.

Turkish authorities say Khashoggi was killed. The Saudis have denied involvement.

How should the U.S. proceed in its talks with Saudi Arabia? What is the best course of action going forward?

With files from the Associated Press

Guests:

Scott Horsley, NPR White House reporter; he tweets @HorselyScott

Aaron David Miller, vice president for New Initiatives at the Wilson Center, a Washington-based non-partisan policy forum that tackles global issues through independent research; former advisor to Republican and Democratic Secretaries of State on Middle East policies; he tweets @aarondmiller2

Henri Barkey, adjunct senior fellow for Middle East studies at the Council on Foreign Relations; professor of international relations at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania; he served on the State Department Policy Planning Staff (1998-2000) working on the Eastern Mediterranean, the Middle East and intelligence-related issues



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