Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Sandra Day O'Connor announces possible Alzheimer diagnosis




Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on July 25, 2012 in Washington, DC.
Former Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on July 25, 2012 in Washington, DC.
T.J. Kirkpatrick/Getty Images

Listen to story

17:08
Download this story 8.0MB

Sandra Day O’Connor, the first woman on the Supreme Court, announced Tuesday that she has the beginning stages of dementia, “probably Alzheimer’s disease.” 

The 88-year-old said in a public letter that her diagnosis was made some time ago and that as her condition has progressed she is “no longer able to participate in public life.” 

“While the final chapter of my life with dementia may be trying, nothing has diminished my gratitude and deep appreciation for the countless blessings in my life,” she wrote. She added: “As a young cowgirl from the Arizona desert, I never could have imagined that one day I would become the first woman justice on the U.S. Supreme Court.”

With files from the Associated Press

Guests:

Eugene Volokh, professor of law at UCLA; he tweets @VolokhC

Kimberly West-Faulcon, law professor at Loyola Law School, her focus includes constitutional law; she tweets @KWestFaulcon

Barry McDonald, professor of law at Pepperdine University, his focus includes constitutional law and First Amendment law