Lively and in-depth discussions of city news, politics, science, entertainment, the arts, and more.
Hosted by Larry Mantle
Airs Weekdays 10 a.m.-12 p.m.

Sunshine or quarantine? In light of Pittsburgh shooter’s posts on social network site Gab, we discuss the most effective ways of dealing with hate speech




People are reflected in a puddle after attending a service at the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall to honor and mourn the victims of Saturday's mass shooting at the Tree Of Life Synagogue on October 28, 2018 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
People are reflected in a puddle after attending a service at the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Hall to honor and mourn the victims of Saturday's mass shooting at the Tree Of Life Synagogue on October 28, 2018 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

Listen to story

21:49
Download this story 10.0MB

The social networking website Gab is now facing an uncertain future because of the Pittsburgh shooter, who was was a user of the site.

The site, which markets itself as a free speech alternative to Facebook and Twitter, has faced criticism for creating a forum for white nationalism, anti-Semitism and other hate speech.

On Saturday morning, the shooter posted: "HIAS likes to bring invaders in that kill our people. I can't sit by and watch my people get slaughtered. Screw your optics, I'm going in." (HIAS is a jewish nonprofit that advocates for refugees.) The CEO of Gab defended the site in an NPR interview, saying that it removes direct threats but that the shooter’s post didn’t violate any rules. On Monday, Gab was “no-platformed” by its hosting providers, pay sites like PayPal and App stores.

Gab touted itself as a platform for anyone, but should there truly be a platform for anyone? Would hate speech on a site like Twitter provide a platform or allow for engagement and discourse to break down such speech? Is that speech better off in a siloed space like Gab? Is a site like Gab the price to pay for freedom of speech?

Guests:

Jeffrey McCall, professor of communication at DePauw University in Indiana and former  journalist; he is a columnist for The Hill; he tweets @Prof_McCall

Jody Armour, professor of law at USC; he tweets @NiggaTheory

Kelly McBride, senior vice president at The Poynter Institute and one of the nation's leading experts on media ethics; she tweets @kellymcb