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California wildfires claim more lives, structures: We discuss if this is the new normal




California's Volunteer Inmate Firefighters work as a group in West Hills, California on November 11, 2018, as they continue their battle to control the Woolsey Fire.
California's Volunteer Inmate Firefighters work as a group in West Hills, California on November 11, 2018, as they continue their battle to control the Woolsey Fire.
FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

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The death toll from the wildfire that incinerated Paradise and surrounding areas climbed to 29 - matching the mark for the deadliest single blaze in California history - as crews continued searching for bodies in the smoldering ruins, with nearly 230 people unaccounted for.

More than 8,000 firefighters in all battled three large wildfires burning across nearly 400 square miles (1,040 square kilometers) in Northern and Southern California, with out-of-state crews continuing to arrive to fight the blaze.

Meanwhile, weather conditions are not helping. Winds are fueling flames, while rains in recent years have been arriving later than usual. Experts say these rain delays can lengthen and intensify the fire season. We discuss if this these wildfire outbreaks are the new normal or are they preventable.

With files from the Associated Press

Guests:

Keith Gilless, professor of forest economics and dean emeritus at the College of Natural Resources at UC Berkeley, his focus includes environmental policy, forestry and wildland fire

Chris Dicus, professor of wildland fire & fuels management at the Department of Natural Resources Management and Environmental Sciences at California Polytechnic State University