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As a federal judge stalls Trump’s asylum ban, we check in on migrant crossings at the border




Central American migrants -mostly Hondurans- moving in a caravan towards the United States in hopes of a better life, walk along the metal fence on the border between Mexicali in Mexico's Baja California State, and Calexico, in California, US, on November 19, 2018.
Central American migrants -mostly Hondurans- moving in a caravan towards the United States in hopes of a better life, walk along the metal fence on the border between Mexicali in Mexico's Baja California State, and Calexico, in California, US, on November 19, 2018.
Pedro Pardo/AFP/Getty Images

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A federal judge has barred the Trump administration from refusing asylum to immigrants who cross the southern border illegally.

President Donald Trump issued a proclamation on Nov. 9 circumventing immigration law, saying anyone who crossed the southern border between official ports of entry would be ineligible for asylum.

But in his ruling Monday, U.S. District Judge Jon Tigar agreed with legal groups that immediately sued, arguing that U.S. immigration law clearly allows someone to seek asylum even if they enter the country between official ports of entry and temporarily barred the ruling from going into place while the case is heard.

Monday’s ruling remains in effect for one month, barring an appeal.

With files from the Associated Press

Guests:

Robbie Whelan, reporter for the Wall Street Journal based in Mexico City, who’s been reporting on the migrant caravan and illegal crossings; he tweets @RWhelanWSJ

Nativo Lopez, an immigrant-rights advocate and senior political advisor for Hermandad Mexicana, a Santa Ana-based non-profit organization defending immigrants’ rights in California; he tweets @NativoVLopez

Mark Krikorian, executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, which supports tighter controls on immigration; he tweets @MarkSKrikorian